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Mahmood Kapustin
Mahmood Kapustin

Buy Used Taxi Cars


You can write off the cost of your taxi cab. You can choose either depreciation of the cost plus other actual expenses, or you can choose to deduct your mileage without deducting the cost of the vehicle.




buy used taxi cars



At CARFAX, we collect events from the lives of millions of used cars from 20 European countries, as well as the USA and Canada. We can then create a vehicle history for every car in our database and make it available to you.The information helps you to check sales data, avoid expensive follow-up costs and negotiate a fair purchase price.


Improve the eco-credentials of your company with our hybrid and electric taxis. Expand the level of service you can offer your customers with our minibus taxis for sale. Regardless of which type of taxi for sale catches your eye, picking out a vehicle is only the start of The Taxi Centre customer experience.


Effective July 1, 2012, California-licensed dealers must obtain a National Motor Vehicle Title Information System (NMVTIS) report from an approved provider before a used vehicle is offered or displayed for sale. If the NMVTIS used vehicle history report indicates the vehicle is or has been a junk or salvage, or the certificate of title contains a brand, the dealer must post a disclosure statement on the vehicle while it is displayed for sale. The only exceptions are when a dealer attempts to obtain an NMVTIS report, but NMVTIS does not have a record for the vehicle, or if the vehicle is a motorcycle, recreational vehicle, or off-highway vehicle subject to identification under California Vehicle Code 38010.


California licensed dealers must obtain a National Motor Vehicle Title Information System (NMVTIS) report from an approved provider before a used vehicle is offered or displayed for sale. If the NMVTIS used vehicle history report indicates the vehicle is or has been a junk or salvage, or the certificate of title contains a brand, the dealer must post a disclosure statement on the vehicle while it is displayed for sale. The only exceptions are when a dealer attempts to obtain an NMVTIS report but NMVTIS does not have a record for the vehicle, or if the vehicle is a motorcycle, recreational vehicle, or off-highway vehicle subject to identification under CVC 38010.


Checker Taxi was a dominant taxicab company and national franchisor that was based in Chicago, Illinois. Checker Motors was an American vehicle manufacturer based in Kalamazoo, Michigan that built the iconic Checker Taxicab, sold commercially as the Checker Marathon until 1982.[1] Both companies were owned by Morris Markin by the 1930s.


Motorized taxicabs began to appear on the streets of major cities from the early 1900s. Particularly in Chicago, where numerous railroads had terminals, there was considerable need for on-demand, point-to-point chauffeur-driven transportation. Hotels, department stores, and office buildings embraced the amenity, but often limited access to their facilities to a single cab company. Kickbacks were common, and the system favored larger operators, who had the financial resources to "play the game".


Competition for fares in Chicago was fierce in the 1920s, and drivers began ganging up on one another between fares. The fighting between the two cab companies escalated to the point of warfare, sparked by the murder of Frank Sexton, who was attempting to organize taxi drivers. In retaliation, Patrick Sexton, Frank's father, killed Jack Rose, who had been accused of the murder, as Rose was being led from an arraignment hearing. As the war escalated, Markin's home was firebombed in June 1923, which was another factor prompting Markin to relocate Checker Cab Manufacturing to Michigan.[4] In 1925, Hertz sold Yellow Coach to General Motors, which reorganized it as Yellow Truck & Coach; however, Hertz retained stakes in Yellow taxi operators in both Chicago (Yellow Cab) and New York (Yellow Taxi).[4]


GM had wanted to sell part of the acquired Yellow Coach business and made an offer to Markin, but Markin declined. Rather than eliminate the capacity of Yellow Coach, General Motors entered the taxicab business in New York City as Terminal Taxi Cab. General Motors operated Yellow Coach as a subsidiary until 1943, at which time the company was merged with GMC Truck Division, and manufacturing shifted from Chicago to Pontiac, Michigan.


A second "taxi war" broke out in the early 1930s, with Checker Taxi Co and Terminal Taxi Co operators fighting it out in New York City. GM flooded the market with its "General Cab", offered to taxi operators for US$360 down and no contract; predictably, drivers took advantage of the generous terms, deferring maintenance and delaying their monthly repayments until they turned the cars back in to GM in various states of disrepair.[5] To end the dispute, New York Mayor Jimmy Walker created the New York Taxi Cab Commission (now called the New York City Taxi and Limousine Commission), which issued a limited number of cab operator permits, called taxi medallions, and mandated that cabs have seating for five passengers in the rear compartment, which favored Checker and a handful of other manufacturers that built automobiles which met this requirement. Over the next three decades, Markin was involved in the formation of "Checker Taxi" or "Checker Cab" companies in several major U.S. cities.


In August 1933, Markin sold Checker Cab Manufacturing to Errett Lobban Cord,[6] but bought it back again in 1936. Markin and Cord were friends, and after Cord bought up interest in Checker, he retained Markin as company head. Meanwhile, the large, heavy Checker Model T, introduced in 1932, featured an 8-cylinder Lycoming engine, the same one that powered the classic Cords at the time. Checker had used Lycoming 6-cylinder engines since the introduction of the Checker Model G in 1927. Prior to that, most Checkers had been powered by 4-cylinder Buda engines.


The 1935 Checker Model Y featured attractive front end styling reminiscent of its contemporary concern sibling, the Auburn.[7] This also used the same Lycoming GFD 8 straight-eight engine as installed in the Auburn. A lower-cost model with a six-cylinder Continental engine arrived in the latter half of 1936.[7] The Y continued in production until 1939. In 1939, Checker introduced a brand new model, the Model A. From that point forward, all Checkers would carry the Model "A" designation, usually with a number.


In 1954, New York City revised its specifications for taxicabs, eliminating the five-passenger rear compartment requirement and stipulating a wheelbase of 127 in (3,226 mm) or less, which effectively took Checker out of the market. A brand-new 120" wheelbase body-on-frame design was introduced in December 1956, called A8, and that basic body style would be retained for the duration of Checker production until the end, in 1982.


The 1956 through 1958 A8 Checkers featured two headlights, 1953-1954 Pontiac Station Wagon taillight lenses, and a thick, single-bar grille. In 1958, quad headlights became legal in the U.S., and Checkers featured the quad headlights from that time forward, along with a new egg-crate grille insert. Parking lights were housed in each far side of the grille insert. Taillights were also changed to the familiar vertical chrome strip housing dual red lenses. Early models also featured a single separate bumper-mounted backup light. Another change between the A8 and later models is the rear window. Originally flat in the A8 with a thicker "C" pillar, the rear window on later models wrapped around a thinner roof-line, affording improved all-around visibility.


For 1960, Checker introduced the A9 series taxi, as well as for the first time, a passenger sedan to be marketed to the general public, the A10 Superba. For 1961, the Marathon sedan and station wagon were introduced, upscale versions of the Superba. The Superba was discontinued in 1963, and from that time on, the taxicabs were designated A11, the Marathon became the A12.


With the cancellation of the Continental inline six-cylinder engine for 1965, Checker switched to Chevrolet overhead-valve inline 6-cylinder engines, with the small-block Chevy 283 and 327 V8s optional. Starting in 1970, Checker used the ubiquitous 350 cubic-inch small-block Chevrolet V8 as an option, which was available until the end of production. GM phased out the Chevy inline six in 1979. Starting in 1980, both Chevrolet and Checker offered a new 229 cubic-inch V6 as the standard engine, with a small-block 305 or 350 V8 as optional.


Starting in 1959, Checker began producing passenger car versions of the taxis to the general public. The first of these models were labeled "A10 Superba" and the line included a sedan as well as a station wagon. Superbas were built from 1960 through 1963. A more luxurious model called the "A12 Marathon" was introduced in 1961, and remained in production until 1982. To the public, Checker cars were advertised as a roomy and rugged alternative to the standard American passenger sedan. A Marathon station wagon (Model A12W) was also offered, but buyers preferred style and power over practicality, so the Checkers saw limited sales with the public.


In 1964, the State of New York pursued Markin and Checker on antitrust charges, alleging that it controlled both the taxi service and manufacture of taxis, and thus favored itself in fulfilling orders. Rather than allow Checker drivers to begin buying different brands of cars, Markin began selling licenses in New York City.


As U.S. Federal safety rules increased throughout the 1960s and 1970s, Checkers kept pace and despite having the same basic body design, Checker enthusiasts can often identify the year of a Checker based on its safety equipment. For example, starting in 1963, amber parking/directional lights were used up front. 1964 models introduced lap belts in front, energy-absorbing steering columns came in 1967. 1968 models featured round side marker lights on fenders along with shoulder belts, and 1969s introduced headrests for front outboard seating positions. 041b061a72


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